Lives Worth Living

A film by Eric Neudel
In Piedmont March 13 and Oakland March 19.

It’s been 23 years since passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990. Today, we take for granted the curb cuts that allow wheelchairs to roll, buses that lower to bring on the disabled, and wheelchair-accessible bathrooms, among many other changes. The Act mandated all these accommodations — because before this, the disabled were on their own.

Lives Worth Living shows us the struggle for visibility and access by disabled people in the United States. The movement started here in Berkeley and spread across the country.

The film features Fred Fay, a quadriplegic who refused to live on the sidelines just because he couldn’t walk, and Ed Roberts, who fought for access to UC Berkeley and started the Center for Independent Living in Berkeley — and the Ed Roberts Campus now commemorates his life’s work

Lives Worth Living is told as an oral history, using archival footage. We see protestors climb from wheelchairs and drag themselves courageously up courthouse steps; we watch as quadriplegic activists maneuver their chairs in front of public buses that are not equipped to accommodate them.  The film ends with the dramatic battle for the Americans with Disabilities Act, one of the most important pieces of civil rights legislation in America’s history. The thousands of individuals who came together to change attitudes and laws demonstrated the power of humanity, cooperation, and self-determination, and what can be accomplished against seemingly insurmountable obstacles.

TWO FREE screenings:

1.   Wednesday, March 13, 2013
@ Ellen Driscoll Theater (Havens Elementary School)

325 Highland Ave / Piedmont 94611
6:30 PM Doors open: Reception | 7 PM Film | 8 – 9 PM Discussion
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2. Tuesday, March 19, 2013
@ The New Parkway
474  24th Street / Oakland 94612

6:30 pm

livies worth living photo 3


 

The Loving Story

At a time when the Supreme Court is considering the fate of laws that prohibit gay marriage, this documentary tells the story of the battle fought by an interracial couple, Richard and Mildred Loving, to marry in their home state: Virginia. Until their landmark Supreme Court case was decided in 1967, Virginia prohibited interracial marriages. Today, this case seems prehistoric – yet the newlyweds were awakened in their bed in the middle of the night by flashlights shining in their faces. When they explained they were married, “Not here, you’re not”, and taking them to jail was the sheriff’s response.

“In a rich collection of 16-millimeter film, old news clips and still photographs, the Lovings don’t look like two people caught up in a cause; they seem like two people caught up in each other.” The New York Times

The other heroes of this amazing story are the two very young ACLU lawyers who persevered to bring the case from their receipt of Mildred’s modest letter asking if there was anything they could do, to their arguing the case before the highest court in the land.

“It ranks alongside Let Us Not Praise Famous Men in its stark beauty and searing honesty.” A perfect way to celebrate Black History Month, or Valentine’s Day.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013
Location: The New Parkway Theater at 474 24th Street, Oakland, CA 94612
Screening: 7pm, with facilitated discussion afterwards form 8:30 – 9.00pm
(food is available for purchase at the Theater)

www.lovingfilm.com

The Education of Shelby Knox

The film is the story of Shelby, a feisty 15 year old in Lubbock, Texas, and a devout Southern Baptist from a conservative Republican family. The only sex education taught at Shelby’s high school is abstinence, after then-Governor George W Bush passed a law outlawing any other type of sex education in the State.

However, Lubbock has some of the highest rates of pregnancy and STDs in the nation. Shelby joins a student group that wants to bring comprehensive sex education to Lubbock high schools, and from this experience becomes an activist. Interwoven with Shelby’s evolution is her changing relationship with her parents, who support her despite her movement away from their beliefs. This is a film told on many levels, from the personal to the political.

Wednesday, October 3, 2012
6:30 PM Doors open, free reception| 7:00 PM Film screening
8:15 PM Discussion

Free

Stonewall Uprising

President Obama has come out in favor of gay marriage, and Federal Courts have ruled California’s ban on same sex marriage violates the Constitution.

Seems hard to believe that in 1969 people in New York City were being arrested, convicted and losing their jobs, for being gay. “It was the Rosa Parks moment,” says one man. June 28, 1969: NYC police raid a Greenwich Village Mafia-run gay bar, the Stonewall Inn. For the first time, patrons refuse to be led into paddy wagons, setting off a 3-day riot that launched the Gay Rights Movement.

“Told by Stonewall patrons, reporters and the cop who led the raid, Stonewall Uprising recalls the bad old days when psychoanalysts equated homosexuality with mental illness and advised aversion therapy, and even lobotomies; public service announcements warned youngsters against predatory homosexuals; and police entrapment was rampant. At the height of this oppression, the cops raid Stonewall, triggering nights of pandemonium with tear gas, billy clubs and a small army of tactical police. The rest is history.” – Karen Cooper, Director, Film Forum

“The most thorough exploration….of what came to be known as gay pride.” Stephen Holden, The New York Times

Thursday, June 21, 2012
6:30 PM Doors open| 7:00 PM Film screening
8:20 PM Discussion facilitated by ADFS

Free

Off and Running

With white Jewish lesbians for parents and two adopted brothers — one mixed-race and one Korean—Brooklyn teen Avery grew up in a unique and loving household. But when her curiosity about her African-American roots grows, she decides to contact her birth mother. This choice propels Avery into her own complicated exploration of race, identity, and family that threatens to distance her from the parents she’s always known. She begins staying away from home,starts skipping school, and risks losing her shot at the college track career she had always dreamed of. But when Avery decides to pick up the pieces of her life and make sense of her identity, the results are inspiring. Off and Running follows Avery to the brink of adulthood, exploring the strength of family bonds and the lengths people must go to become themselves.

“A unique and very American coming-of-age story that delves into the psyche of race through a fresh and careful dissection of a family’s struggle.”
-Tribeca Film Festival

Thursday, May 3, 2012
6:30 PM Doors open, free snacks, coffee and tea | 7:00 PM Film screening
8:20 PM Community discussion facilitated by ADFS

Free

www.OffandRunningtheFilm.com

Salaam Dunk!

Basketball is much more than a game in SF filmmaker David Fine’s stirring documentary about an Iraqi women’s basketball team at the American University of Iraq — Sulaimani (AUIS) in Kurdistan. For the young women on the team, most of whom have never touched a basketball or been allowed to play any sport, it is a blissful release from the realities of a war-torn nation.

They come from all ethnicities and sects — Arab, Kurd, Christian, Sunni, Shiite — but the joy they discover in playing and working with the young American man who coaches them reveals an Iraq united in a way we don’t see in the headlines.

David Fine will attend the screening, and be there to fill you in on how Salaam Dunk was made, and what’s happened since.

Thursday, March 29, 2012
6:30 PM Doors open and informal reception | 7:00 PM Film screening
8:20 PM Discussion with filmmaker David Fine
Free

Piedmont Annual Celebration of the Life and Teachings of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

This is a special event, please note the different location. All are welcome.

Date and Time
January 16, 2012, 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Location
Piedmont Community Hall, 711 Highland Avenue, Piedmont, CA 94611 (Map)

Event Details
– Music by Oaktown Jazz
– Presentations by Piedmont Unified School District students
– Potluck Lunch: People are encouraged to bring a dish to share that reflects their heritage
(side dish, salad, dessert or bread).
– We will show a new film about Dr King at about 1:30pm: “At the River I Stand”

For more info contact LoisCorrin@gmail.com or call 510-420-1534.

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AT THE RIVER I STAND
The 1968 Memphis Sanitation Workers Strike and the Assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King

Produced and directed by David Appleby, Allison Graham and Steven Ross

This moving documentary recounts the two months leading to Martin Luther King Jr.’s death in 1968, after he had come to Memphis to support the strike of 1300 Memphis sanitation workers.

Spring 1968 in Memphis marked the dramatic climax of the Civil Rights movement. At the River I Stand skillfully reconstructs the two eventful months that transformed a strike by Memphis sanitation worker into a national conflagration, and disentangles the complex historical forces that came together with the inevitability of tragedy at the death of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

This 58-minute documentary brings into sharp relief issues that have only become more urgent in the intervening years: the connection between economic and civil rights, debates over strategies for change, the demand for full inclusion of African Americans in American life and the fight for dignity for public employees and all working people.

http://newsreel.org/video/AT-THE-RIVER-I-STAND