Linsanity

Linsanity is documentary about the rise of star Asian-American basketball player, Jeremy Lin. Director Evan Jackson Leong wanted to show how Lin dealt with racism in college sports and the NBA. Lin, a high school all-star in Palo Alto, received no college scholarship offers. Despite being a star on his basketball team at Harvard, he was not drafted by the NBA. Nevertheless he broke into the NBA after playing for in the Summer League, and played first for the Golden State Warriors, his home-town team. Lin was the first American of either Chinese or Taiwanese descent to play in the NBA. Lin was waived by the Warriors in late 2011, but was picked up by the New York Knicks. They also were planning to waive him before the contract deadline February 10, 2012. But “because we were playing so badly”, the Knicks coach finally gave Lin a break.

Linsanity is about what led up to that break, and what followed. It’s about an entire nation of basketball fans going “Linsane.” Lin scored more points in his first 5 NBA  starts than any other player in the modern era, and created a legitimate public frenzy.  The film explores his family background, how his parents came from Taiwan and how he was guided by faith, desire, and love of the game.

The film is presented by the Piedmont Asian American Club & Appreciating Diversity Film Series (sponsored by Piedmont Appreciating Diversity Committee, Piedmont League of women Voters & DiversityWorks.)

2 Free Screenings
In Piedmont on March 19
Ellen Driscoll Theater

325 Highland Avenue, Piedmont 94611
6:30 Reception | 7:00 Screening | 8:30 Discussion

In Oakland on March 22
The New Parkway, 474 24th Street, Oakland 94612
3:15 PM: Screening and Discussion

The Invisible War

The Invisible War is a film about the all too common, profoundly distressing problem of sexual assault in the American military. The film gets some of its power from the statistics alone: the military estimates that one in five women and many men in the military has been the victim of sexual assault.  Victims are often discouraged from reporting such crimes because the attackers are their superiors, or those further up the chain either implicitly or even explicitly threaten their jobs and their careers.  Reports that are made are often ignored; instead, women are dismissed or even prosecuted themselves.

Many of the victims in this film grew up in military families, with a strong respect for the military and its traditions. The interviews of the women are remarkable. You will witness their courage, their candor and their struggle to make the military change its manner of handling reports of abuse. At a time when the military is a crucial source of employment and training for so many aspiring young people, and it is popular to tout “supporting our men and women in uniform,” the goals of these victims should be important to us all.

Called “haunting” by Time Magazine, “heartbreaking” by The Washington Post, and “unforgettable” by salon.com, The Invisible War was named one of the New York Times’ best ten films of the year.  Their review concluded, “This is not a movie that can be ignored.”

(The film includes victims’ descriptions of violent attacks but no violent or sexual images. It is recommended for ages 14 and older.)

Two free Screenings

1.   Wednesday, November 13, 2013
@ Ellen Driscoll Theater (Havens Elementary School)
325 Highland Ave / Piedmont 94611
6:30 pm: Reception | 7 pm: Film | 8:00 pm Facilitated community discussion
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2. Saturday, November 16, 2013
@ The New Parkway
474  24th Street / Oakland 94612
3:00 pm Film
Refreshments available for purchase


Poor Kids

Poor Kids – A film by Jezza Neumann
This moving documentary focuses on the children in three American families in the Quad Cities, a great American crossroads along the border of Iowa and Illinois. Told in the words of the children themselves, this one-hour documentary offers a unique perspective on America’s depressed economy after the financial crisis of 2008,  and the impact of unemployment, foreclosure and financial distress.

As Brittany, one of the children, says, “It could happen to you. It only takes one slip up, one thing to go wrong…. And it might be nothing to do with you, nothing to do with the way you’re leading your life. But even a natural disaster can take you down to ground zero”.

Winner of the Robert F Kennedy Award for Television Journalism 2013

Two free Screenings

1.   Thursday, September 26, 2013
@ Ellen Driscoll Theater (Havens Elementary School)
325 Highland Ave / Piedmont 94611
6:30 pm: Reception with light refreshments | 7 pm: Film | 8:00 pm Discussion
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2. Saturday, September 28, 2013
@ The New Parkway
474  24th Street / Oakland 94612
3:00 pm Film | 4:00 pm Discussion
Food available for purchase

poor kids


The Education of Shelby Knox

The film is the story of Shelby, a feisty 15 year old in Lubbock, Texas, and a devout Southern Baptist from a conservative Republican family. The only sex education taught at Shelby’s high school is abstinence, after then-Governor George W Bush passed a law outlawing any other type of sex education in the State.

However, Lubbock has some of the highest rates of pregnancy and STDs in the nation. Shelby joins a student group that wants to bring comprehensive sex education to Lubbock high schools, and from this experience becomes an activist. Interwoven with Shelby’s evolution is her changing relationship with her parents, who support her despite her movement away from their beliefs. This is a film told on many levels, from the personal to the political.

Wednesday, October 3, 2012
6:30 PM Doors open, free reception| 7:00 PM Film screening
8:15 PM Discussion

Free

Off and Running

With white Jewish lesbians for parents and two adopted brothers — one mixed-race and one Korean—Brooklyn teen Avery grew up in a unique and loving household. But when her curiosity about her African-American roots grows, she decides to contact her birth mother. This choice propels Avery into her own complicated exploration of race, identity, and family that threatens to distance her from the parents she’s always known. She begins staying away from home,starts skipping school, and risks losing her shot at the college track career she had always dreamed of. But when Avery decides to pick up the pieces of her life and make sense of her identity, the results are inspiring. Off and Running follows Avery to the brink of adulthood, exploring the strength of family bonds and the lengths people must go to become themselves.

“A unique and very American coming-of-age story that delves into the psyche of race through a fresh and careful dissection of a family’s struggle.”
-Tribeca Film Festival

Thursday, May 3, 2012
6:30 PM Doors open, free snacks, coffee and tea | 7:00 PM Film screening
8:20 PM Community discussion facilitated by ADFS

Free

www.OffandRunningtheFilm.com

Salaam Dunk!

Basketball is much more than a game in SF filmmaker David Fine’s stirring documentary about an Iraqi women’s basketball team at the American University of Iraq — Sulaimani (AUIS) in Kurdistan. For the young women on the team, most of whom have never touched a basketball or been allowed to play any sport, it is a blissful release from the realities of a war-torn nation.

They come from all ethnicities and sects — Arab, Kurd, Christian, Sunni, Shiite — but the joy they discover in playing and working with the young American man who coaches them reveals an Iraq united in a way we don’t see in the headlines.

David Fine will attend the screening, and be there to fill you in on how Salaam Dunk was made, and what’s happened since.

Thursday, March 29, 2012
6:30 PM Doors open and informal reception | 7:00 PM Film screening
8:20 PM Discussion with filmmaker David Fine
Free

Accidental Hero: Room 408

Winner of the Audience Award for Best Documentary, New York International Film & Video Festival

Press Release
“America’s embattled public education system provides kindling for numerous negative news stories—school shootings, drugs, gang violence. Accidental Hero: Room 408 provides a powerful exception to those stereotypes. Following an East Bay public high school teacher and his class, the film tells the story of Tommie Lindsey, an extraordinary man who is changing lives by introducing his students to a little known academic sport called “forensics.” Accidental Hero has important messages about the tremendous potential that young people from diverse backgrounds can realize when they are given the support of good teachers and ample educational tools.”
(56 minutes) by Terri DeBono and Steve Rosen

Welcome to the world of forensics: students train and compete in oratory, debate, and dramatic interpretation of events. By letting students draw on their cultural backgrounds – sometimes pent up pain or anger – the teacher channels emotions into spellbinding performances in this engrossing documentary. Film contains strong language.

Thursday, January 19, 2012
6:30 PM Reception with light snacks | 7:00 – 8:00 PM Film Screening
8:00 – 9:00 PM Community Discussion

Free


http://www.pbs.org/accidentalhero/film/